historyofromanovs:

Empress Alexandra Feodorovna of Russia (1798-1860) with three of her daughters: Maria (1819-1876), Olga (1822-1892), and Alexandra Nikolaevna (1825-1844). The mother and daughters were very devoted to each other. Alexandra and her husband, Emperor Nicholas the First, were warm and affectionate parents, but avoided overindulging their children. In the evenings, Alexandra Feodorovna played games with her children, including riddles and charades. The Emperor liked to sing chorus music with them. The siblings grew up in a close knit family, remaining in good terms all their lives. 
The girls were raised together. Their rooms, located on the ground floor of the Winter Palace, were unpretentious and void of luxury. The girls were prescribed fresh air in all seasons, and doctors controlled their diet. The youngest daughter, Alexandra, was the first in the family to die at the young age of nineteen and was the only one who did not live a full life. Her parents and family were devastated and their grief would last until the end of their lives.

historyofromanovs:

Empress Alexandra Feodorovna of Russia (1798-1860) with three of her daughters: Maria (1819-1876), Olga (1822-1892), and Alexandra Nikolaevna (1825-1844). The mother and daughters were very devoted to each other. Alexandra and her husband, Emperor Nicholas the First, were warm and affectionate parents, but avoided overindulging their children. In the evenings, Alexandra Feodorovna played games with her children, including riddles and charades. The Emperor liked to sing chorus music with them. The siblings grew up in a close knit family, remaining in good terms all their lives.

The girls were raised together. Their rooms, located on the ground floor of the Winter Palace, were unpretentious and void of luxury. The girls were prescribed fresh air in all seasons, and doctors controlled their diet. The youngest daughter, Alexandra, was the first in the family to die at the young age of nineteen and was the only one who did not live a full life. Her parents and family were devastated and their grief would last until the end of their lives.

April 24 2014, 09:35 PM   •   22 notes   •   Via: historyofromanovs   •   Source: historyofromanovs
romanovdreams:

Olga and Tatiana on the beach, 1912.

romanovdreams:

Olga and Tatiana on the beach, 1912.

April 24 2014, 08:38 PM   •   15 notes   •   Via: romanovdreams   •   Source: romanovdreams

ohsoromanov:

The Winter Palace Through The Ages - Nicholas II

On his accession, Nicholas II was keen to return to the residence in the capital. The palace architect, Alexander Krasovsky, was entrusted with creating private rooms for the Emperor and his wife, Alexandra Fiodorovna. In December 1895 they moved into the Winter Palace and lived there permanently in the winter. In 1904, after the birth of their incurably ill son Alexei, the imperial family moved to the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo, visiting the Winter Palace only for formal ceremonies, banquets and receptions.

Receptions were rare events. Those who attended them unanimously agreed that Empress Alexandra Fiodorovna was stunningly beautiful in a dress sprinkled with diamonds, but everyone also noticed how burdensome she found the performance of her public duties. The imperial couple were not fond of the high life. “Extremely modest and simple in his private life, the Tsar was obliged to submit to the demands of etiquette. The ruler of one sixth of the globe could receive guests only in an atmosphere of extravagant luxury,” wrote the historian Grand Prince Alexander Mikhailovich.

In 1915, during the First World War, the state rooms of the Great Enfilade were converted into a military hospital named in honour of the heir to the throne. Empress Alexandra Fiodorovna and her daughters worked in the hospital as nursing assistants.

The personal apartments of Nicholas II and his wife were created in the second storey of the north-western corner block, beyond the Malachite Room that was among the state rooms of the palace whose historical appearance was preserved. The rooms that Briullov had decorated for Empress Alexandra Fiodorovna in 1838-39 were converted for the young imperial couple. Later they had been occupied by Maria Fiodorovna, the wife of Alexander III, who had a few minor changes made there.

The rooms were a sort of self-enclosed complex, a separate apartment. They were supposed to embody the young couple’s domestic ideal, a cosy, welcoming home. The Emperor’s diaries show that they both devoted much attention to the fitting out of their apartments.

Krasovsky, the architect, showed himself to be a master with immense erudition and superb taste. The combination of brilliant historical stylization with Moderne (Art Nouveau) elements made the apartments of the last Russian Emperor’s family a unique work of art. Sadly, the majority of the interiors have not survived and today we only have a few photographs, architect’s drawings and archive documents. Each room that Krasovsky created is an elegant paraphrasing of the style of a particular historical era.

Nicholas II’s Study and Library were finished in wood in imitation of the English Middle Ages. All the details of the interior and the furniture are decorated with Gothic-style carving. An important element in both interiors were the Gothic fireplaces embellished with griffons and lions, heraldic figures from the arms of the Romanov House and the Hesse-Darmstadt House, to which the Empress belonged. The interior of the Library has survived, as has the Small Dining-Room with decor that combines features of Classicism, the Baroque and Rococo. The dining-room contains some genuine 18th-century items - tapestries made in St Petersburg, an English chandelier and a mantel clock.

The hands of the clock are stopped at 2.10, the time early in the morning on 26 October 1917 when the ministers of the Provisional Government were arrested in the Small Dining-Room. The Winter Palace had been the seat of the government since July 1917. The workplaces of its members and officials were located in the former apartments of the last Russian emperor, the Malachite Room and a few adjoining state rooms.

April 24 2014, 08:38 PM   •   10 notes   •   Via: naotmaa   •   Source: ohsoromanov

The more I know about Queen Victoria and Prince Albert the less likeable they are. They were so utterly horrible to some of their children. So selfish too! Reading “Edward and Alexandra - Their private and public lives” and I can hardly believe my eyes at how awful Albert was to his son. History textbooks certainly don´t tell you this….

April 23 2014, 10:04 PM   •   3 notes
olga-nikolayevna:

olga-nikolayevna:

New rare of Tatiana and Olga!!!

I just realized this is the first pic of Olga with her cat Vaska! 

Actually it may be just a random cat as cats were kept on board to prevent mice taking over. There are pictures of Imperial children playing with their kittens.

olga-nikolayevna:

olga-nikolayevna:

New rare of Tatiana and Olga!!!

I just realized this is the first pic of Olga with her cat Vaska! 

Actually it may be just a random cat as cats were kept on board to prevent mice taking over. There are pictures of Imperial children playing with their kittens.

April 22 2014, 11:47 PM   •   198 notes   •   Via: the-lost-empires   •   Source: the-lost-empires
ella-indigo:

Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich (1876-1938) and Grand Duke Boris Vladimirovich (1877-1943) in 1878.

ella-indigo:

Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich (1876-1938) and Grand Duke Boris Vladimirovich (1877-1943) in 1878.

April 21 2014, 07:44 PM   •   11 notes   •   Via: ella-indigo   •   Source: ella-indigo
tiny-librarian:

Princesses Alexandra and Dagmar of Denmark.
Source

tiny-librarian:

Princesses Alexandra and Dagmar of Denmark.

Source

April 19 2014, 05:18 PM   •   69 notes   •   Via: tiny-librarian   •   Source: tiny-librarian
antiqueroyals:

Grand Duchess Olga of Russia with Princes Aage, Erik  and Axel of Denmark

antiqueroyals:

Grand Duchess Olga of Russia with Princes Aage, Erik  and Axel of Denmark

April 17 2014, 09:30 AM   •   79 notes   •   Via: romanovdreams   •   Source: antiqueroyals